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PRESIDENCY 2000:



OTHER REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES


Ex-Governor Lamar Alexander (Tennessee)

Alexander never really stopped campaigning for President after his unsuccessful 1996 run. Despite his early start, Alexander was unable to raise the money he needed to run a viable campaign for 2000. After a weak finish in the Iowa GOP Straw Ballot in August 1999, Alexander withdrew from the race. He subsequently endorsed George W. Bush for President. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Alexander.


US Senator John Ashcroft (Missouri)

An early 2000 favorite of Religious Right conservatives within the GOP, Ashcroft spent much of 1998 exploring the Presidential race, raising money and campaigning around the country on behalf of GOP candidates. He surprised most observers when he announced in January 1999 that he would not enter the Presidential race but would instead focus his energies on his hotly contested re-election campaign. He endorsed George W. Bush for President in January 2000.


Gary L. Bauer (Virginia)

Bauer, as the head of the social conservative Family Research Council and its Campaign for Working Families PAC, is best known for his vocal pro-life and anti-gay rights views. A close associate of national evangelical community leader Dr. James Dobson, Bauer formerly served in the Reagan Administration and worked closely with many Religious Right organizations. His social conservative message never took hold, as fellow social conservatives Steve Forbes and Alan Keyes ultimately squeezed him out of the race in February 2000. He subsequently endorsed John McCain for President. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Bauer.


Samuel H. "Sam" Berry, Jr. (Oregon)

Berry is a Harvard-educated tax lawyer who promises to "find creative solutions to people's problems." His views on issues range from centrist conservative to soft libertarian -- with tax reform as his central campaign issue. Berry has never before held any political office. Nice web site featuring an interactive forum. Berry was previously a candidate for US Senator in a 1995 special election -- but finished a distant eight place in the GOP primary. This year, Berry captured 61 votes (12th place) in the New Hampshire GOP primary. He withdrew from the race in February 2000.


David H. Birchler (Indiana)

Running as a write-in Independent candidate for President in 1996, Birchler captured 18 votes. He's back in 2000 -- running as a Republican -- and presumably trying to improve on his 1996 showing. His website promises to carry "information on my business operations, once the city of Indianapolis stops illegally destroying my operation and stealing material." He denounces corruption in Indiana politics -- and even goes as for as to accuse politicians, lawyers, police officers and others of plotting a possible assassination attempt against him because of his lawsuit which "attempted to recover a cat that was stolen." One section of his campaign site deals entirely with cats he has owned. As for a platform, Birchler backs gun control, drug legalization, "free college tuition," adoption of a national sales tax in lieu of an income tax, fair government and "purity in law" (i.e., legislation on a topic could not carry amendments related to other topics).


Lynda D. Blodgett (Texas)

Blodgett, 43, identifies herself as a fashion designer. Although she has no political experience, she lists her community involvement as participating in the Sew and Sew for Charity Circle and membership in her local Methodist Church. Blodgett, divorced, has two daughters.


Calvin Reed Brown (Utah)

Dr. Brown -- a 74-year-old retired surgeon -- previously served for 22 years in the Armed Forces. He lost races for Congress in 1968 and 1998 and for State Representative in 1980. Brown is also active in the Mormon church. He supports replacing the federal income tax with a national sales tax. He also advocates broad campaign finance reforms, greater use of the death penalty, increased penalties for the sale of illegal drugs, gun control legislation and an end to Affirmative Action programs.


Patrick J. "Pat" Buchanan (Virginia)

A conservative commentator and former aide to Presidents Nixon & Reagan, Buchanan previously lost GOP Presidential bids in 1992 and 1996. Making a third White House run in 2000, Buchanan quit the Republican Party and bolted to the Reform Party in October 1999. The reason: Buchanan said that Republican leaders made it virtually impossible for anyone to seriously challenge George W. Bush for the GOP nomination. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Buchanan.


Richard E. Calderwood (New Mexico)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Kenneth A. "Ken" Capalbo (Rhode Island)

Capalbo, 56, has previously lost races for School Board and State Senator. A retired state prison employee, he concedes his chances of winning the GOP nomination are "ultra slim." His two main issues are replacing the federal income tax with a 1.66% flat tax on wealth and adoption of a consistent foreign policy. Capalbo captured 51 votes (13th place) in the New Hampshire GOP primary.


Franklin D. Christensen (Arizona)

Christensen, who was previously a candidate for President in 1996, garnered no attention during his last run. No other information is known about this GOP hopeful.


Lawrence J. "Larry" Clark (North Carolina)

Although Clark -- a retired Army sergeant -- filed with the FEC, he withdrew from the Presidential race in August 1999 after being denied permission to participate in the Iowa GOP Straw Poll. He subsequently joined the Libertarian Party and became a candidate for North Carolina Governor in 2000 (although he ultimately dropped out of that race, too).


Mitchell E. Dailey (Vermont)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Elizabeth H. "Liddy" Dole (North Carolina)

Dole, a former Presidential Cabinet member and former President of the American Red Cross, was initially viewed as George W. Bush's most significant opponent for the GOP nomination. Her weak fundraising numbers, however, doomed her effort. Despite a respectable third-place finish in the Iowa GOP Straw Ballot in August 1999, a lack of money forced Dole to withdraw from the race in October 1999. She subsequently endorsed George W. Bush for President in January 2000. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Dole.


Ex-Congressman Robert K. "Bob" Dornan (California)

Despite a "Draft Dornan" effort touting the 2000 candidacy of this 1996 Presidential contender, Dornan announced in late 1999 that he does not plan to be a candidate for any office in 2000. Instead, he plans to concentrate on expanding his new, three-hour "Bob Dornan Show" on the Talk Radio Network and promoting his son Mark's campaign for Congress.


Saundra S. Duffy (California)

Duffy, a sign language interpreter for the deaf and a gun rights advocate, withdrew from the GOP race in January 2000 to instead seek a Congressional seat (note: she lost the GOP primary by a wide margin).


Thomas S. Fabish (California)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Lowell J. "Jack" Fellure (West Virginia)

Fellure was previously a Presidential candidate in 1996. Except that he is married and has six children, no other information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Malcolm S. "Steve" Forbes Jr. (New Jersey)

Forbes, a multi-millionaire magazine publisher, spent over $65 million of his own money on his two failed Presidential bids. His 1996 campaign -- centered around his call for replacing the current federal income tax with a flat tax -- won him attention and a good showings in a few early primary states. Following that campaign, Forbes shifted his ideology away from the libertarian views he espoused in 1996 and quickly adopted a hardcore Religious Right agenda on social issues. The strategy worked to the extent he was able to lock-up much support from Christian Coalition activists -- a group of supporters largely responsible for his strong second-place finish (30%) this year in the Iowa caucuses. In the sparsely attended -- and little reported -- Alaska caucuses, Forbes lost to George W. Bush by a margin of just 5 votes. However, his distant third place finishes in New Hampshire (13%) and Delaware (20%) forced him to withdraw from the race in February 2000. Forbes subsequently endorsed George W. Bush for President in March 2000. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Forbes.


Bobby Gawthorp (Maryland)

Gawthorp is an Army veteran, a teacher and a Baptist lay minister. This young, conservative, "Generation X" candidate for President promises a campaign about generational issues -- especially as Gawthorp did not himself become legally old enough to even run until 1999. An additional link is Project Vote Smart: Bobby Gawthorp.


Benjamin S. "Benjy" Gleitman (Texas)

No information is known about this "Republican Independent" hopeful.


Marcus J. Gumz (Wisconsin)

Gumz, an Army veteran, has worked as a farmer for the past 51 years. He is also a widower and father of eight children. As for community involvement, Gumz has been active in local chapters of the Jaycees, Toastmasters and Kiwanis. He briefly served on the local Drainage District Commission and was a write-in candidate for Congress in 1998.


Mark "Dick" Harnes (New York)

No background information is known about this Republican hopeful -- although he captured 34 votes (15th place) in the New Hampshire GOP primary.


US Senator Orrin G. Hatch (Utah)

Senator Hatch's entire campaign strategy seemed to be: "If frontrunner George W. Bush stumbles, then I'm ready to be the alternative candidate who can lead the Republican Party." Hatch's strategy never caught fire with voters -- and he withdrew from the race in January 2000 after a dismal sixth place finish (1%) in the Iowa GOP Caucuses. He then immediately endorsed George W. Bush for President and refocused his efforts on his 2000 re-election campaign. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Hatch.


Lawrence Hornung (Missouri)

Hornung captured 98 votes (last place) in the Missouri GOP primary. Beyond that, no background information is known about this Republican hopeful


Mildred "Millie" Howard (Ohio)

Howard, who ran previously ran for President in 1992 and 1996, is making a third bid in 2000. A medical secretary and 62-year-old mother of four grown children, she holds a junior college degree in Pre-Business Administration. Arguing that politics in America is "corrupt" and our current system is "socialistic," Howard calls for smaller government. In a very libertarian vein, she also demands the elimination of any laws that codify immorality (which Howard defines as "abortion, bankruptcy, divorce"). "Government needs to be moral and the rest will fall in place," Howard explains. Her central theme is creation of a "$10,000 Birth Right Stipend" program to eliminate all current entitlement programs.


Harry S. Hunt (Michigan)

Originally from California, Hunt holds a bachelor's degree in religion and formerly worked as a school teacher and flight instructor. He currently owns an airfreight company.


Michael J. Jackson (New Jersey)

A somewhat delusional candidate, Jackson claims to have been an "astronaut, chemist, cheif [sic] of staff, general, green barret [sic] ... minister ... scientist, SEALs [sic], state legislator" and more. In the area of politics, he claims to have been an ambassador and has experience "passing laws [and] protecting the Ten Commandments." Amusingly, Jackson also notes he is a member of the Automobile of America Association, National Rifle Association, Shoprite Price Plus Club, Columbia House Video Club and Friends of the [Star Trek] Federation.


Roger H. Jewell (Arizona)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Mark A. Jobe (Maryland)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Derrick C. Johnson (Washington)

Johnson -- who will turn 35 during the 2000 campaign -- is a former US Army officer and 1994 Oregon Congressional candidate. On issues, he is generally a Religious Right conservative and expresses strong support for states' rights and a stricter interpretation of the US Constitution. He withdrew from the GOP race in December 1999 to become the Vice Presidential runningmate on the America's Party ticket headed by hopeful Joe Bellis -- although Bellis ultimately quit the race on July 3, 2000.


Timothy C. "Tim" Kalemkarian (California)

A 1994 write-in candidate for US Senate, Kalemkarian now wants to take his message nationwide. No other information is known about this GOP hopeful.


Congressman John R. Kasich (Ohio)

As Chairman of the House Budget Committee, Kasich was a frequent guest on the national news programs. After several months on the campaign trail, however, Congressman Kasich withdrew from the Presidential race and endorsed George W. Bush for President in July 1999. He subsequently decided not to seek re-election to Congress in 2000. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Kasich.


Ambassador Alan L. Keyes (Maryland)

Keyes, an uncompromising Religious Right conservative, has made his opposition to abortion and gay rights the central issues of his campaign. With a vibrant oratorical style, he won applause -- but not a lot of votes. A surprisingly strong showing in the Iowa Caucuses (3rd place - 14%) allowed Keyes to squeeze fellow social conservative Gary Bauer from the race. Iowa, however, was Keyes' best early showing as he dropped back into the low single-digits in all of the early primary states (and back rose into the double digits only after McCain dropped out). Still -- despite that fact that Bush had locked up the nomination -- Keyes happily soldiered on until days before the start of the national convention. In April 2000, Keyes threatened he would bolt to the Constitution Party if Bush ultimately picked a pro-choice VP runningmate. When Bush selected pro-life Dick Cheney as his runningmate on July 25, 2000, Keyes withdrew and endorsed Bush later that same day. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Keyes.


Michael S. "Lev" Levinson (Florida)

Levinson, a former New Yorker, has been a frequent candidate for office during the past dozen years (not that's he's appeared on ballots -- but that he's regularly filed paperwork intending to run for Congress, President, etc.). In a cute touch on an otherwise bizarre candidacy, Lev's 85-year-old mother (the self-proclaimed "oldest living webmaster on the internet") runs Lev's aggrandizing campaign website. Much of the voluminous site ranges from incoherent gibberish to the truly weird. Mom claims that Michael is "a living prophet" because "he writes things down before they happen" and "has answers to current world problems that clearly set him apart from all the rest of mankind." If elected, he promises "world peace and food chain harmony." The site also contains selections from his twelve-hour long Biblical poem entitled "Adman and Even" from the Book of Lev. Here's a brief selection (and I swear that I'm not making this up): "Wun Day God's Sun Was Stan Ina Roun Got Puncht Ina Side Cried Wa Turnd Round She Sed Hya My Name Is Ka That What Is Yers He Said Adman She Sed Even. God Said 'Adman Ka's Cut Frum Yerib She's Yer Mate To Kid But Stay Offer He'd.'" Huh?? Apparently Lev is a candidate that only a mother could endorse! Lev emailed Politics1 in mid-March 2000 -- after Bush already captured enough delegates to win the GOP nomination -- to state that he was still getting ready to launch his write-in campaign for the GOP nomination against Bush.


Stanleigh H. "Stan" Lusak (Nevada)

Lusak -- a former US Postal worker -- finished in last place (9th) in the 1998 GOP primary for Nevada Lieutenant Governor. Emboldened by his finish, he's now making a run for President. Lusak promises to eliminate the federal income tax and foreign aid and adopt the libertarian "Fully Informed Jury Amendment" proposal.


Anthony R. "Andy" Martin (Florida)

Frequent candidate, former US Senate aide and legal activist Andy Martin has been running for various offices for years. He previously ran for President in 1988. A pro-life Evangelical Christian who says he supports "many of the policies of the Christian Coalition," Martin has oddly made support for gay rights the central theme of his campaign -- his campaign even maintains a mirror web site address at www.GayRepublicans.org. Martin pointedly notes that he is not gay, but believes that heterosexual Republicans must take action "for the gay and lesbian community to be accepted by the Republican Party." He sums up his views on government as "Get out of my bank account, get out of my bedroom and get out of my computer." Martin acknowledged on his site that he has no chance of defeating Bush and the other leading GOP candidates, but hoped to use his candidacy to make the frontrunners address his agenda of issues -- before launching his candidacy for US Senator in Florida in 2000. After running a controversial TV spot in New Hampshire in which he attacked Bush for having a cocaine and alcohol problem, Martin captured 81 votes (11th place) in that state's GOP primary. He withdrew from the race in February 2000 and subsequently endorsed John McCain.


US Senator John McCain (Arizona)

Senator McCain, a former Vietnam War POW and champion of campaign finance reform, ran a strong "outsider" campaign in the early contest states. With limited financial resources, he opted to skip the Iowa Caucuses and battle frontrunner Bush in the New Hampshire primary. The gamble worked, as McCain defeated Bush in New Hampshire by a wide margin. Bush came back with a win in South Carolina, only to see McCain win an amazing upset victory in Michigan (and also win Arizona) just days later. "Super Tuesday" primary losses in New York, California and Ohio on March 7th ended the viability of McCain's insurgent challenge and he withdrew from the race two days later. Although polling well nationally (24%) as an Independent hopeful for the general election, McCain also said he was loyal to the GOP and would not continue his campaign as an Independent or third party candidate. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of McCain.


Barry W. McClain (Washington)

Except that McClain is 52 years old and attended Central Washington State College, little else is known about this GOP hopeful.


John R. McGrath (Arizona)

Except that McGrath captured 230 votes (6th place - 0.1%) in the Arizona Republican primary, little other information is known about this GOP hopeful.


Bradley W. Moler (Ohio)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Robert E. "Rob" Moreau (California)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Timothy L. "Tim" Mosby (California)

Mosby, 55, describes himself as an "out-of-work, self-taught scientist." He wants to use his campaign to discuss hybrid cars that run on electricity and gasoline and the greater use of space technology -- including a manned mission to Mars in order to boost the US economy and colonize space. Mosby captured 41 votes (14th place) in the New Hampshire GOP primary.


Thomas L. "Tom" Oyler (Kansas)

Oyler, an industrial engineer, has been a frequent candidate in Kansas in recent years. After losing the 1996 GOP primary for US Senator by a wide margin, Oyler ran for US Senator as the Libertarian Party nominee in 1998 before rejoining the GOP in 1999. As could probably be surmised from his affiliation in the 1998 campaign, Oyler espouses fairly libertarian views (except for his pro-life position). He said he is running because he is "upset with everything that's going on and I thought I'd give it a shot." Oyler plans to campaign mainly through the use of internet chat rooms. His campaign slogan: "Oyler for President. Better Than None of the Above." Oyler finished in last place in the New Hampshire GOP primary with just 14 votes.


Richard C. Peet (Virginia)

Peet, 71, spent many years as an attorney working on Capitol Hill and drafting proposed bills for GOP legislators. Peet said he has a better understanding of the legislative process than the other GOP hopefuls -- and plans to produce a series of detailed position papers. He captured 23 votes (16th place) in the New Hampshire GOP primary.


James J. Prattas (California)

Campaigning under the slogan of "Love is the Way," Prattas describes himself as "a poor ignorant soul who is just an artist, healer and disabled combat Vietnam veteran living on a stipend ... [and] uneducated and ignorant a compared to most of my fellow citizens." His unusual campaign website is decorated with his original art works throughout the various pages. His autobiographic story tells of near death experiences (including meeting God and seeing angels), meeting celebrities, his fights with he US military after being wounded in Vietnam, death threats against him by the Hawaiian Mafia, a ploy by President Bush's friends to have him arrested when he wanted to challenge Bush in the 1992 race, his use of marijuana, his divorce and more. Prattas' detailed campaign platform covers issues ranging from International Trade and Highway Infrastructure to Freedom and Love. An additional link is Project Vote Smart: James Prattas.


Ex-Vice President J. Danforth "Dan" Quayle (Arizona)

Quayle would have been a strong contender for the GOP Presidential nomination in 1996. Instead, he passed on the 1996 race and subsequently decided to enter the 2000 contest. While he was viewed favorably by Religious Right conservatives within the party and was well-connected to a sizable financial donor base, Quayle's campaign never caught on with GOP voters. After a weak finish in the Iowa GOP Straw Ballot in August 1999, Quayle withdrew from the race one month later and endorsed George W. Bush in February 2000. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Quayle.


John D. Roberts (Tennessee)

Roberts, the owner of a small computer repair business, badly lost a primary race for Tennessee Governor in 1998. Prior to entering the private sector, he spent nearly a decade in the US Navy working in top secret satellite communication programs. As for issues, Roberts is pro-gun, pro-choice, pro-flat tax, pro-death penalty and pro-campaign finance reform.


Angel Joy Rocker (Florida)

Rocker, a school guidance counselor and motivational speaker active in Christian ministries, concedes she does not have any real chance of winning the GOP nomination. Chavis-Rocker, the first black woman to ever seek the GOP Presidential nomination, instead hopes to use her campaign to draw more black voters into the GOP. She writes that he campaign committee is "composed of mostly African-American ministers and laymen of various denominations." As far as issues, her top priority is the "restoration of our country's education and health care systems." Rocker has already picked up one endorsement: controversial black State Rep. Billy McKinney (D-GA), the father of liberal Congresswoman Cynthia McKinney (D-GA). One of only three GOP candidates to campaign in the largely ignored Alabama GOP Straw Poll in August 1999 -- Keyes and Hatch were the other two candidates who attended -- she still finished in last place (just a few votes behind Dan Quayle) and withdrew from the race soon afterwards. An additional link is Project Vote Smart: Angel Joy Chavis Rocker.


Alford Rogers (North Carolina)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Tennie Beatrice Rogers (Oklahoma)

Rogers previously ran for President in 1992 and 1996 -- actually appearing on the ballot in the 1992 GOP primary in Oklahoma. A 73-year-old retired nurse who wrote a book entitled Standing Up: Running for President about her previous two campaigns, Rogers is back again for a third run in 2000. Rogers -- who concedes she will have little money for the race -- is trying to secure ballot status by the petition route. She describes herself as a "pro-family, pro-choice candidate with traditional values formed on Judeo-Christian principles." She supports term limits and less government regulations -- and opposes gay rights, excessive defense cuts and racial hiring quotas. Rogers is also simultaneously running for Congress in Oklahoma's District 2.


Joe C. "Average Joe" Schriner (Ohio)

Schriner, 44, is the director of an "Independent Catholic Ministry" and a former substance abuse counselor. A former newspaper reporter, he also works these days as a freelance journalist. Schriner's campaign slogan: "The common Joe for the common good." He switched to Independent in Summer 2000 to continue his campaign.


Robert G. Schumaker (Wisconsin)

Schumaker, who claims a 6th grade education, touts an unbelievable background in the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco & Firearms. Of course, he also claims involvement with "Mental Health Organizations."


Chuck See (Arizona)

Except that See captured 29 votes (9th -- and last -- place) in the Arizona Republican primary, little other information is known about this GOP hopeful.


U.S. Senator Robert C. "Bob" Smith (New Hampshire)

Smith, the single most conservative member of the entire US Senate, ran a rather quixotic Presidential campaign. On January 1, 1999, Smith announced his candidacy for the GOP Presidential nomination. In July 1999, Smith bolted from the GOP -- denouncing the Republican Party as unprincipled and insufficiently conservative on the issues of abortion and guns -- and announced he would seek the US Taxpayers Party nomination. Then, in August 1999, Smith announced he would not seek the USTP nomination but instead would run as an Independent. Finally, citing lackluster fundraising totals, Smith withdrew completely from the Presidential race on October 28, 1999 and rejoined the GOP four days later. He subsequently endorsed George W. Bush for President and said his brief departure from the GOP had been "a mistake." Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Smith.


Governor Tommy G. Thompson (Wisconsin)

After spending nearly a year discussing his interest in entering the Presidential race, Governor Thompson formally withdrew from the race in May 1999. He subsequently endorsed George W. Bush for President. Follow the above link to Politics1's detailed profile of Thompson.


Charles B. Urban (Texas)

Urban, a surveyor, finished in last place in the Texas primary with 764 votes (7th place - 0.1%). Beyond that, no background information is known about this Republican hopeful


Patrick Waldron (New York)

Waldron is touting a "3% health care plan which takes a 3% cut from life insurance settlements, annuities, paychecks, welfare checks, and social security to pay for an even health care coverage for all US citizens." He emailed Politics1 in March 2000 that he is continuing his low-key Presidential campaign even though Bush has already secured the GOP nomination ("Does a marathon runner quit running just because the first and second person crossed the finish line before them? Of course not!"). Waldron, a part-time musician, also has an online site featuring his original music.


Joseph "Joe" Weber (Missouri)

An Army veteran, Weber now works for the Missouri Department of Corrections. He supports a balanced budget, reducing the national debt, simplification of the federal tax code, an 80% increase in environmental recycling programs and a privatization of the Social Security system. Weber plans to run an internet-based campaign for President.


Verel T. Westover (Kansas)

No information is known about this Republican hopeful.


Dorian Yeager (New Hampshire)

An actress, novelist and twice divorced mother, Yeager espouses a mostly libertarian philosophy. Yeager financed her low-budget and less-than-serious campaign entirely by the sale of bumper stickers. Of course, she wouldn't mind if you wanted to buy a copy of one of her books. Her slogan is also rather unique: "Would you vote for Dorian Yeager? Let's face it, you've done worse -- and probably will again!" Yeager captured 98 votes (10th place) in the New Hampshire GOP primary.


James T. Zanon (Arizona)

Except that Zanon captured 57 votes (8th place) in the Arizona Republican primary, little other information is known about this GOP hopeful.


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This page was last updated on September 9, 2000